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GNU/Linux File System hierarchy (FSH)

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The GNU/Linux File System is organized as a hierarchy. If you are coming from a Microsoft Windows Operating System environment, the first thing you may notice is the difference in File System Hierarchy. Unlike Microsoft Windows Operating Systems, which provides a separate hierarchy for every partition, GNU/Linux provides a single hierarchy that includes every partition. The top level directory of the GNU/Linux File System tree is the root directory, represented by a forward slash (/). All other directories come under the root directory (/).

Directory

Description

/

The root directory, the top-level directory in the FHS. All other directories are subdirectories of root

/bin

Essential command line utilities.

/boot

Includes Linux startup files, including the Linux kernel.

/dev

Device Files

/etc

Most of the configuration files are stored here

/home

Home directories for almost every user.

/lib

Program libraries for the kernel and various command line utilities.

/media

The mount point for removable media, including floppy drives, DVDs, and Zip disks.

/mnt

A legacy mount point; formerly used for removable media.

/net

The standard mount point for network directories

/opt

Common location for third-party application files.

/proc

A virtual File System. Currently running kernel-related processes, including device assignments such as IRQ ports, I/O addresses, and DMA channels, as well as kernel configuration settings such as IP forwarding.

/root

The home directory of root user (superuser)

/sbin

System Administration Commands

/selinux

Currently configured settings associated with Security Enhanced Linux.

/tmp

Temporary files. Red Hat Enterprise Linux deletes all files in this directory periodically.

/usr

Programs, libraries, documentation etc. for all user-installed programs.

/var

Variable data, including log files and printer spools.

              Jajish Thomason Google+
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